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Despite its unrealistic plot, ‘Stuart Little’ still teaches a lot about adoption

It’s 1999, and Stuart Little has both taken over the film screens and captured the attention of many. Twenty-one years later, if you decide to watch this movie, here are some quick answers to your expected questions: First, no, being in quarantine is making you hallucinate. That, indeed, is a mouse being adopted by a family. Second, yes, of course a mouse being adopted is impractical, but the movie still has a lot of insightful details about adoption. Here is what the movie does well:

It perfectly encapsulates how it feels to have a new sibling

When Frederick and Eleanor Little decide to take a chance on a teenage mouse named Stuart and bring him home from the orphanage, their other son, George, is blatantly upset. It’s hard enough to gain a new sibling, but finding out he’s a mouse? It’s basically incomprehensible. However, the way George reacts isn’t solely because Stuart’s a mouse. This is a normal reaction for anyone when someone joins the family. Change is scary, and this is a good reminder for parents to talk to their children about impending additions to the family.

The emphasis on the adoptee feeling lonely is crucial

When Stuart notices that George doesn’t like him, he goes to his parents to express just how alone he feels. This prompts the Littles to conduct their own investigation into Stuart’s biological family, but of course, that wouldn’t happen in reality. Whether you adopt from an agency or an orphanage, you most likely know where your child is coming from, so no research is needed. However, you should be ready for a conversation with them about feelings of loneliness and adapting to a new lifestyle.

Adopting who you feel is perfect for you, no matter what differences, is all that matters

The Littles didn’t know they were going to adopt a mouse when they woke up that morning. They just knew they were going to find a new addition to their family, someone they would wholeheartedly love for the rest of their days. Every prospective adoptive family should have this mindset. Of course, you aren’t going to adopt a mouse, but you may find some children who have differences along the way. Stuart Littleis a reminder to cherish those differences and let them change your life for the better.

If you want to learn more about creating your own family or find adoption resources, visit Adoption Choices of Arizona or call or text us:
Expectant Parent Call or Text 1-480-900-5520
Adoptive Parent Call or Text 1-480-999-4788

 

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